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zeldathemes
Freedom For Whales

Exposing the dirty little secrets behind whale and dolphin captivity. ”My point is simple: these incredible animals deserve better. They don’t deserve cleaner water or more trainers. They deserve freedom." If you want only Cetacean posts, be sure to blacklist "not cetacean" and "personal" :)
I think the problem with dolphins in captivity is more like what these animals are about, and the space that they need to survive, and specific behavior that they display. They need to roam free in the ocean. A tank can never be enough to support the needs of these animals, because of their brain, because of their complex social life, and because of their need of ranging widely in the ocean. The wild Bottlenose Dolphins here in my study area for instance, range from Baja California all the way to the Oregon Coast. So they range for hundreds and hundreds of miles and move up and down the coast. So, these are not animals you can put in a tank, they just go in circles.
Dr Maddalena Bearzi, Field Biologist and Co-founder of the Ocean Conservation Society (via anticapquotes)
rhamphotheca:

Super rare Footage of the World’s Fastest Whale
by Jason G. Goldman
One lucky research assistant caught a rare show in the Straits of Gibraltar last week, as a fin whale was spotted breaching the water three times in a row, right in front of her. While fin whales do sometimes breach, it’s rarely seen and even more rarely caught on camera.
The videographer, Séréna, is a summer research assistant with CIRCE, a Spain-based cetacean conservation, research, and education organization.
Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) are the second largest creatures on our planet, just after blue whales. When you consider that the average fin whale needs to hurl its 80+ tons and 89+ feet out of the water and into the air, the spectacle becomes even more amazing. As one of the fastest whales in the world, the fin can reach cruising speeds of 23 mph with short bursts up to 29 mph. (The Sei whale may beat it for short sprints up t0 40mph, but not for cruising speed.) Their impressive speed has given Fin whales the nickname “greyhounds of the deep.”
(go see video at io9)
[source: The Dodo; CIRCE]

rhamphotheca:

Super rare Footage of the World’s Fastest Whale

by Jason G. Goldman

One lucky research assistant caught a rare show in the Straits of Gibraltar last week, as a fin whale was spotted breaching the water three times in a row, right in front of her. While fin whales do sometimes breach, it’s rarely seen and even more rarely caught on camera.

The videographer, Séréna, is a summer research assistant with CIRCE, a Spain-based cetacean conservation, research, and education organization.

Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) are the second largest creatures on our planet, just after blue whales. When you consider that the average fin whale needs to hurl its 80+ tons and 89+ feet out of the water and into the air, the spectacle becomes even more amazing. As one of the fastest whales in the world, the fin can reach cruising speeds of 23 mph with short bursts up to 29 mph. (The Sei whale may beat it for short sprints up t0 40mph, but not for cruising speed.) Their impressive speed has given Fin whales the nickname “greyhounds of the deep.”

(go see video at io9)

[source: The Dodo; CIRCE]

One of the issues the Orca face is that they are such remarkable animals, and because of that, people want to see them up close and personal. So there are other people who want to make a profit from that. They capture the Orca from the wild, rip them out of their families, and they dump them into these concrete tanks, and make them perform tricks. People pay to go and see that, they’re brainwashed into thinking that this is a really good thing to see and a good thing to do, that it’s family entertainment. They just don’t seem to realize how much these animals suffer. So one of the things that I’m trying to do now is help educate the public, and help make the public realize that this is not acceptable anymore. This is something that should be part of our history, not something that should be part of our future. We really, as individuals, need to make that effort, and every one of us can by saying that we will not buy a ticket to any place that keeps a whale or dolphin in captivity.
Dr. Ingrid Visser, Wild Orca Researcher (via anticapquotes)
fuckyacetaceans:

Lagenorhynchus australis (by gastonCc)

fuckyacetaceans:

Lagenorhynchus australis (by gastonCc)

Why do you only care about freeing whales? Especially when you have a captive fish yourself

Anonymous

I care about not having ANY animals who are not suitable for captivity freed. Betta fish can lead very comfortable and adequate lives in captivity if cared for properly, which I’m pretty sure I’m doing because I’ve been consulting with people much more experienced on the matter than I am.

Y’all I forgot to show you! I got Azul some silk plants, and a new place to hide out! The picture of him is a little blurry because he’s too busy checking out his new plants to stop and flare up for a good picture.

I just did a 50% water change too, I’m starting to get good at this! The only thing I can’t do is get him to eat his bloodworms! He’s only been eating his flakes, every time I try to feed him a bloodworm he has no interest in it and I end up having to fish it out. I know it’s not good for him to be eating only flakes so I’m not sure what to do!

  #personal    #betta fish  
metalmeteor:

Breaking Free

metalmeteor:

Breaking Free

sayonaraseaworld:

WOOO!!

SeaWorld’s stock may be down on Wall Street, but it definitely appears to be up with Democratic Governor Jerry Brown.

After repeated battering by animal-rights advocates over the issue of orca captivity, the marine-animal emporium on Mission Bay went to war against detractors and hired a pricey Sacramento lobbying outfit this spring to fend off passage of state legislation to ban whale shows at the park.

Then Brown included SeaWorld’s marketing vice president Marilyn Hannes on his three-day trade-promoting trip to Mexico to visit with president Enrique Peña Nieto late last month.

Now, according to an August 20 disclosure filing with the California Secretary of State’s Office, Brown has received a $25,000 reelection campaign contribution made by the Orlando, Florida-based operation August 19.

Brown didn’t take a public position on the SeaWorld bill, authored by Santa Monica Democratic assemblyman Richard Bloom, but it was obvious to many capitol observers that he wasn’t exactly rooting for its passage.

"Some party leaders, perhaps even those on Gov. Jerry Brown’s team, did not want to hand Republicans a jobs issue in an election year," reported U-T San Diego’s Michael Gardner in a post-mortem on Bloom’s legislation, which was shelved by the Assembly’s Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee in April.

Whether jobs or more personal financial considerations played a part in Brown’s reticence to get involved, SeaWorld’s full-court press included paying its Sacramento-based contract lobbyist, Montgomery Consulting, LLC., $40,000 during the second quarter of this year, according to a disclosure report filed by the company July 30.

The influence-peddling boutique is run by Pete Montgomery, who used to be government-affairs chief for oil giant BP North America and was chief of staff for former Republican senator Bruce McPherson of Santa Cruz.

In addition to its Sacramento spending, during 2013 SeaWorld spent $600,000 for lobbying activities connected with the Animal Welfare, Marine Mammal Protection and Endangered Species Acts, according to the website Odwyerpr.com.

As first reported here in March, SeaWorld gave heavily to local congressmembers of both parties and has backed the Republican Lincoln Club with $15,000 for its battle against city-worker pensions, among other local political contributions.

160captives:

Gender: Female
Pod: A5 (?)
Place of Capture: Pender Harbor, British Columbia, Canada
Date of Capture: December 12, 1969
Age at Capture: Approx. 2 years or less

On December 12, 1969, a pod of 12 Orcas were captured in Pender Harbor. 6 were kept, while the remaining 6 were released.

The smallest whale, Patches, was moved with Corky II and Kenny to Marineland of the Pacific. The park already had two performing Orcas, Corky and Orky II. Patches soon joined Corky and Orky II in the show pool.

After Corky’s passing in December 1970, Corky II was moved in; all the whales seemed to get along very well.

In August 1971, Patches died due to a Mediastinal Abscess as well as Salmonellosis, an infection caused by Salmonella bacteria.

x | x | x

endcetaceanexploitation:

And so it starts again…..swim far, swim fast, swim free sweet souls

endcetaceanexploitation:

And so it starts again…..swim far, swim fast, swim free sweet souls

fortheocean:

Long-beaked common dolphins are warm water dolphins but will come into the monterey bay almost about every 7 years with the warm water, i was lucky enough to see them in a pod of about 250 dolphins

fortheocean:

Long-beaked common dolphins are warm water dolphins but will come into the monterey bay almost about every 7 years with the warm water, i was lucky enough to see them in a pod of about 250 dolphins

If anyone seriously wants to talk about you guys not knowing about underwater animal abuse, I suggest everyone watch the film called Blackfish. It's also on Netflix and focuses mainly on the orcas in Seaworld, but the abuse would apply to all underwater animals held in captivity. That film made me bawl my eyes out, and what has made me decide to be a marine biologist.

Anonymous

gurrrl, u hella fine

Anonymous

Gurrrrlll

derangedhyena-delphinidae:

sayonaraseaworld:

WOOO!!

Was anyone else bizarrely amused by:

Protestors: We probably have about 100 people today.”
Seaworld: A representative with SeaWorld says he put the number of protesters at less than 90 people.’

I know the Seaworld rep likely did not have knowledge of the protesters’ self-declared headcount when they spoke, but this comes across as hilariously desperate. It’s not as if that’s a large discrepancy (intentional on the part of the news outlet, maybe?)

'100? No, it was more like… 90!'