z
zeldathemes
Freedom For Whales

Exposing the dirty little secrets behind whale and dolphin captivity. ”My point is simple: these incredible animals deserve better. They don’t deserve cleaner water or more trainers. They deserve freedom." If you want only Cetacean posts, be sure to blacklist "not cetacean" and "personal" :)

kimberlyrules:

Dawn to Death -The Dolphins of Taiji: A well made documentary about the slaughter. You are warned. It’s about half an hour. It’s even filmed with a hidden camera behind the blue tart.

lol captivity literally runs the taiji dolphin slaughter, If you are pro marine park, you are indirectly supporting it whether or not you think it's right.

Anonymous

fightingforwhales:

pretty much yeah

theincredibleorca:

fightingforwhales:

happy-pigeons:

earthsoldiers:

The dolphin pod is now in the cove. It’s over.
Taiji, Japan. The slaughter begins.
I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry.

While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States attempt to slander SeaWorld and free captive born cetaceans, Taiji, Japan is killing dolphins for pest control……….
While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States who masturbate to Blackfish are making up statements that SeaWorld still captures, Russia is currently capturing a half a dozen orcas………
While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States accuse SeaWorld of doing nothing for wild animals, dolphin “activists” continue to do nothing for wild orcas off the coast of Washington that are slowly being wiped out by PCB pollution, overfishing, interfering boat traffic, Navy sonar, etc……….

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project, an anti-SeaWorld and anti-captivity ACTIVIST organization who has a large presence in Taiji, Japan and is helping stop the slaughter and dolphin captures.
Russian Orcas, a research group that is supportive of Blackfish and is working directly in Russia to stop wild orca captures.
Orca Network, an anti-SeaWorld organization who focuses on aiding wild orcas off the coast of Washington and raises awareness about pollution, overfishing, boat traffic, and sonar.
Tell me, how is SeaWorld assisting Taiji dolphins? How are they helping prevent Russian orca captures? How are they helping whales on the west coast of the US? Stop pretending that SeaWorld is doing all of these things, because they aren’t. The groups that are out there right now helping wild cetaceans are largely anti-captivity “activist” groups that you love to slander so much.

For real. The anti-captivity groups are likely the strongest opponents of the Taiji slaughter. Most people wouldn’t even know about it if it wasn’t for Ric O’Barry & Friends. SeaWorld does little for wild dolphins, Taiji or otherwise. I mean, how much does SW work to raise awareness? How much money do they give to causes that help wild animals? Do they ever try to push for legislation to help wild dolphins?

theincredibleorca:

fightingforwhales:

happy-pigeons:

earthsoldiers:

The dolphin pod is now in the cove. It’s over.

Taiji, Japan. The slaughter begins.

I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry.

While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States attempt to slander SeaWorld and free captive born cetaceans, Taiji, Japan is killing dolphins for pest control……….

While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States who masturbate to Blackfish are making up statements that SeaWorld still captures, Russia is currently capturing a half a dozen orcas………

While dolphin “activist” organizations in the United States accuse SeaWorld of doing nothing for wild animals, dolphin “activists” continue to do nothing for wild orcas off the coast of Washington that are slowly being wiped out by PCB pollution, overfishing, interfering boat traffic, Navy sonar, etc……….

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project, an anti-SeaWorld and anti-captivity ACTIVIST organization who has a large presence in Taiji, Japan and is helping stop the slaughter and dolphin captures.

Russian Orcas, a research group that is supportive of Blackfish and is working directly in Russia to stop wild orca captures.

Orca Network, an anti-SeaWorld organization who focuses on aiding wild orcas off the coast of Washington and raises awareness about pollution, overfishing, boat traffic, and sonar.

Tell me, how is SeaWorld assisting Taiji dolphins? How are they helping prevent Russian orca captures? How are they helping whales on the west coast of the US? Stop pretending that SeaWorld is doing all of these things, because they aren’t. The groups that are out there right now helping wild cetaceans are largely anti-captivity “activist” groups that you love to slander so much.

For real. The anti-captivity groups are likely the strongest opponents of the Taiji slaughter. Most people wouldn’t even know about it if it wasn’t for Ric O’Barry & Friends. SeaWorld does little for wild dolphins, Taiji or otherwise. I mean, how much does SW work to raise awareness? How much money do they give to causes that help wild animals? Do they ever try to push for legislation to help wild dolphins?

fightingforwhales:

Have you seen Blackfish? Curious about orcas in captivity? Want to know more about how it affects them? Here is a comprehensive list of the bulk of the issues, from both pro-captivity and anti-captivity perspectives, to satisfy your thirst for knowledge about this controversial issue:
ANTI-CAPTIVITY SOURCES
General Overview of Orcas in Captivity:
What IS so Bad About SeaWorld?
Killer Controversy: Why Orcas Should No Longer be Kept in Captivity 
Killer Whales Don’t Belong in Captivity—and Here’s Why
The Case Against Killer Whale Captivity
Blackfish: How Captivity Affects Killer Whales
Killer Whales Should Not be Held Captive
The Debate: Anti-Captivity Views
Blackfish Director: Killer Whales Don’t Belong in Captivity
Captures of Wild Orcas
The Penn Cove Orca Captures
Rounding Up Shamu with Don Goldsberry
Orca Stories—Penn Cove—Don Goldsberry of SeaWorld Inc.
The Heartbreaking Real-Life Capture of Orcas
North Eastern Pacific Captures
North Western Pacific Captures
Icelandic Captures
Impact of the Captures Between 1962 and 1973 on the Southern Resident Killer Whale Community
Orca Pod Destroyed in Japan
Russian Orca Capture 2003
Russian Orca Captures: The Inside Story
Two Orcas Taken in Illegal Capture in Russia
Corky Hears Her Family
Heath Problems/Injuries/Unnatural Deaths in Captivity
The Hidden Cost of Captivity: Orca Health of Killer Whales Exposed
Dorsal Fin Collapse in Killer Whales Explained
Winnie the Orca Ingests Coins, Tiles, and Other Objects 
Kotar’s Skull Crushed by Gate
Captive Orcas and Mosquitoes 
Killer Whale Captivity: Is Shamu Stressed?
SeaWorld Orca Missing Huge Chunk of Chin
What’s Eating Keet, SeaWorld’s Captive Killer Whale?
SeaWorld’s Killer Whales Doped Up on Valium to Deal With Captive Life
Keto and Tilikum Express the Stress of Orca Captivity
Wild Orca vs Captive Orca Lifespans
Life Expectancy of Orcas in Captivity
Survival Rates in Captivity
How Long Do Orcas Live?
Everything Wrong With SeaWorld’s Claims About Orca Lifespan
SeaWorld Talks Killer Whale Life Expectancy and Fails Miserably
103-Year-Old Killer Whale Roaming the Canadian Coast
The Truth About Wild Orca Lifespans
NOAA Statement on Wild Orca Lifespan
Do Killer Whales Live Longer in a SeaWorld Tank or the Ocean?
Stereotypical/Abnormal Behaviors in Captivity
When the Orcas Aren’t Performing
Keet Blowing Bubbles
Keet Blowing Bubbles Part II
Kalia Lies Motionlessly On Slideout
Tilikum Floats at Surface with Mouth Hanging Open
Kamogawa Sea World Orcas Throw Themselves on Slideouts
Ulises Floats Motionlessly
Ikaika Lying on Bottom of Tank
Corky in a Comatose State
Gifs and Videos of Abnormal and Stereotypical Behaviors
Statements from Wild Orca Scientists
Kenneth Balcomb on Captivity
Eva Saulitis on Captivity
Dr. Ingrid Visser Speaks on Orcas in Captivity
Orca Expert (Paul Spong) Provides Insight
Ken Balcomb and Lolita (end of video)
Info/Statements from Ex-Trainers
Ex-SeaWorld Trainers Speak Out Against Captivity
Kim Ashdown, Former Trainer
Blowing the Whistle—Ex-SeaWorld Orca Trainers Speak Out
Jeff Ventre, Former Trainer
Former Trainer Says Killer Whale Captivity Causes Attacks
Samantha Berg, Former Trainer
Blackfish Backlash: Former SeaWorld Trainer Carol Ray Speaks with Latin Times About Movement Started by Controversial Film
Exclusive Interview: Former SeaWorld Trainer John Jett PhD Talks Tilikum
Captive Orca Attacks and the Deaths of Trainers
List of Attacks in Captivity
The Debate: Dangers to Trainers
Kasatka Attacks and Nearly Drowns Ken Peters [Video]
Brian Rokeach Bitten and Held Underwater By Orkid [Video]
Kyuquot Attacks Steve Aibel *note: video is incorrectly labled as Dawn Brancheau*
Original Shamu Attacks Annette Eckis [Video]
Attack at Marineland France [Video]
Orca Lunges at Trainer at Japanese Aquarium [Video]
Orkid and Splash Attack Trainer Tamaree and Break Her Arm [Video]
Lolita Snaps at Guests [Video]
Killer in the Pool (comprehensive report of the deaths of Keltie Byrne, Dawn Brancheau, and Daniel Dukes)
Blood in the Water (Death of Alexis Martinez)
Aggression Between Captive Orcas
The Death of Kandu 5
Killer Whale Bled to Death After Breaking Jaw in Fight
Do Orcas at Marine Parks Injure One Another?
Trials of Tekoa
Strikes, Bites and Blood: The Graphic Case for Releasing Morgan, the Wild-Born Orca, From Captivity
Gudrun Attempts to Drown Daughter Nyar
Shamu Cam Aggression [Video]
Kalia Raking Ulises
The Issue of Lolita the Orca
A Day in the Life of Lolita, the Performing Orca
Lolita’s Life Before Capture
Lolita’s Capture
Lolita Today
Lolita: Slave to Entertainment
Liberating Lolita
From Washington State to Miami, Florida: Lolita’s Story
Lolita the Orca—Caught, Bought, and Betrayed by the Hertz Family
Is There Hope for Lolita, the World’s Loneliest Orca?
Lolita the Orca: Facts, Legal Issues, and How to Get Her Home
Lolita’s Retirement Plan
Kiska, Canada’s Loneliest Whale
Marineland Conditions for Killer Whale Still Substandard
Marineland: Killer Whale Bleeding for Months, Trainer Says
The Life of Kiska
Marineland In Depth: Kiska Suffers at Marineland
Free Kiska: The Loneliest Killer Whale in the World
It’s Time to Relocate Kiska, the “World’s Loneliest Orca”
Marineland Killer Whale is Ill
Argentina’s Only Captive Orca: Kshamenk
Sam Simon Says Kshamenk is ‘Most Abused Orca in the World’
Kshamenk History
Kshamenk Needs Humans to Help Him, Not Exploit Him
Free Kshamenk
Kshamenk—Not What We Thought, Something Bigger
Legal Battles Involving Orca Captivity
SeaWorld vs OSHA
Court Denies SeaWorld Appeal of OSHA Citations
Here’s All the Places Around the World That Ban Orca Captivity
NY “Blackfish” Bill to Ban Orca Captive Orcas Approved by Senate Committee
"Blackfish" Inspires California Orca Bill
California Bill Would Ban SeaWorld Orca Shows
Bill to Ban Captive Orcas Put on Hold in California
PRO-CAPTIVITY SOURCES
(Please note: I do not agree with nor endorse any of the articles below, but I included both sides of the argument for the sake of fairness. In addition, I know this list is small, but please understand that it is extraordinarily difficult to find orca-specific articles from a pro-captivity point of view that actually focus on orcas alone. If you know of any more articles, please message me and I will gladly include them on this list.)
Statements from SeaWorld
Truth About Blackfish
Health and Daily Care
Lifespan
Research Publications at SeaWorld
FAQ
Social Structure
69 Reasons You Shouldn’t Believe Blackfish
SeaWorld Responds to Questions About Captive Orcas
Pro-Captivity Articles/Vidoes
Pro-Captivity Views
A Stronger Case for SeaWorld
Zoologist Explains Benefits of Orca Captivity
SeaWorld Expanding Killer Whale Tanks
Interview with Mark Simmons, Former Trainer
Former Trainer Responds to Blackfish
Should Killer Whales be Kept in Captivity?

fightingforwhales:

Have you seen Blackfish? Curious about orcas in captivity? Want to know more about how it affects them? Here is a comprehensive list of the bulk of the issues, from both pro-captivity and anti-captivity perspectives, to satisfy your thirst for knowledge about this controversial issue:

ANTI-CAPTIVITY SOURCES

General Overview of Orcas in Captivity:

Captures of Wild Orcas

Heath Problems/Injuries/Unnatural Deaths in Captivity

Wild Orca vs Captive Orca Lifespans

Stereotypical/Abnormal Behaviors in Captivity

Statements from Wild Orca Scientists

Info/Statements from Ex-Trainers

Captive Orca Attacks and the Deaths of Trainers

Aggression Between Captive Orcas

The Issue of Lolita the Orca

Kiska, Canada’s Loneliest Whale

Argentina’s Only Captive Orca: Kshamenk

Legal Battles Involving Orca Captivity

PRO-CAPTIVITY SOURCES

(Please note: I do not agree with nor endorse any of the articles below, but I included both sides of the argument for the sake of fairness. In addition, I know this list is small, but please understand that it is extraordinarily difficult to find orca-specific articles from a pro-captivity point of view that actually focus on orcas alone. If you know of any more articles, please message me and I will gladly include them on this list.)

Statements from SeaWorld

Pro-Captivity Articles/Vidoes

seaslaverysucks:

Look at Nat Geo on Instagram being all anti-cap again. ;) #orcasbelonginthewild

160captives:

Gender: Male
Pod: Southern Residents (J pod)
Place of Capture: Carr Inlet, Washington State
Date of Capture: March 12, 1972
Age at Capture: Approx. 2 years

On March 12, 1972, a large group of Orcas were captured off Carr Inlet in Washington State waters. Canuck, also known as J-24, was believed to be the grandson of the (approx.) 103 year old matriarch of J pod, J-2 Granny.

Not long after his capture, Canuck was purchased by SeaWorld San Diego but was transferred to SeaWorld Aurora due to the limited tank space at the San Diego park. He was also the first Orca to be transferred to SeaWorld Orlando, where it was possible he met Kandu III.

On December 1, 1974, Canuck died during a show due to a fungal infection known as Candidiasis.

x | x

fightingforwhales:

sometimes i forget kalia is pregnant and then when i remember i get all pissed off again.

fightingforwhales:

Solstice L89 by SanJuanOrcas on Flickr.

fightingforwhales:

Solstice L89 by SanJuanOrcas on Flickr.

plays

derangedhyena-delphinidae:

seaworldcares:

SeaWorld opposes the cruel and inhumane treatment and slaughter of dolphins in the annual drive fishery in Taiji, Japan. Despite our public opposition, a small but vocal group of activists continue to mislead people into thinking that dolphins from the hunt end up at SeaWorld. Hear more about our position directly from the executive who oversees the care of all the animals at SeaWorld Orlando. SeaWorld is a member of the Alliance of Accredited Marine Mammal Parks & Aquariums. Join us, and AAMMPA, in our opposition to the slaughter of dolphins at www.ammpa.org

"Seaworld and all its team-members are totally passionate to the conservation and care of their animals, in their care, as well as any animal that needs help with rescue, rehabilitation, and return to the wild. That’s why we are so opposed to these drive fisheries in Japan, and elsewhere in the world."

They’re caring really hard, guys. The opposition is oozing from their pores. I mean, they might even upgrade to finger-wagging and tongue-clucking if the slaughter continues.

Aka do as we say, not as we did. We don’t have any animals from the drive fisheries in our parks because they’re all dead now :D 

marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

  #not cetacean  
utcjonesobservatory:

Proposed California Law Would Free SeaWorld’s Orcas: 
A California lawmaker has proposed a ban on keeping killer whales in captivity for purposes of human entertainment.
Announced today by Assemblyman Richard Bloom, D-Santa Monica, the Orca Welfare and Safety Actwould outlaw SeaWorld-style shows, as well as captive breeding of the creatures. Violations would be punished by $100,000 in fines, six months in jail, or both.
No hearing has yet been scheduled on the proposal, which will require a majority vote to pass through legislature. It’s also unclear how much support the bill will have, though California has passed progressive animal legislation in the recent past, including bans on shark fin soup and hunting bears with dogs.
“There is no justification for the continued captive display of orcas for entertainment purposes,” Bloom said in a public statement. “These beautiful creatures are much too large and far too intelligent to be confined in small, concrete tanks for their entire lives. It is time to end the practice of keeping orcas captive for human amusement.”
Bloom’s proposed law isn’t the first of its kind: South Carolina banned the public display of dolphins in 1992, as did Maui County, Hawaii in 2002. In February of this year, New York state senator Greg Ball introduced a bill that would ban orca confinement in sea parks and aquariums.
Unlike those states, however, California is home to SeaWorld San Diego, where 10 orcas — roughly one-fifth of all captive orcas — are used in performances. “This is a huge state in which to have that ban,” said Lori Marino, a neurobiologist and founder of the Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy.
In recent years, the experience of captive orcas has come under scrutiny by animal advocates and some scientists, who say that aquarium conditions are simply inappropriate for animals as big, intelligent and highly social as orcas.
As evidence, advocates point to the physical and mental problems of orcas in captivity: They’re short-lived, prone to disease, have difficulty breeding, display extreme aggression and in some cases appear to be emotionally disturbed.
Such was the case with Tillikum, an orca at SeaWorld Orlando who killed three people, including SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau. Her death and SeaWorld’s orcas were the subject of Blackfish, a 2013 documentary that inspired Bloom’s measure, which was written with assistance from Blackfishdirector Gabriela Cowperthwaite and Naomi Rose of the Animal Welfare Institute.
SeaWorld San Diego did not reply to requests for comment, but in a statement, spokesman David Koontz criticized Bloom for “associating with extreme animal rights activists.”
Koontz said the bill reflected the “the same sort of out-of-the-mainstream thinking” as an infamous lawsuit, filed by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and dismissed in 2012, which invoked the United States Constitution’s slavery-abolishing 13th amendment as grounds for freeing SeaWorld’s orcas.
“We engage in business practices that are responsible, sustainable and reflective of the balanced values all Americans share,” wrote Koontz.
Andrew Trites, head of the University of British Columbia’s Marine Mammal Research Unit, said that misgivings about keeping whales and dolphins in captivity are not restricted to activists and extremists. They’re something many scientists grapple with.
“We think about this a lot,” he said, “I do understand the strong feelings of those who think it’s entirely wrong. I also understand the value of keeping them in captivity.”
Studying captive orcas can provide information about health and physiology that’s otherwise difficult to obtain, and can be used to benefit wild orcas, said Trites. “But it has to be about more than just entertainment,” he said. “They have to be serving some greater good.”
Marino noted that the bill allows research on orcas held for rehabilitation after being rescued from injury or stranding. Those orcas couldn’t be kept in aquariums, though, but rather in enclosed, shallow-water sea pens that are open to the public — a compromise, perhaps, between greater-good benefits and individual well-being.
Orcas now kept at SeaWorld would be returned to the wild or, if that’s not possible, also kept in sea pens.
If Bloom’s bill passes, it could inspire other such measures, said Marino. “The science is so overwhelming that members of the legislature are convinced, and are putting this out there,” she said. “This is historic.”

utcjonesobservatory:

Proposed California Law Would Free SeaWorld’s Orcas: 

A California lawmaker has proposed a ban on keeping killer whales in captivity for purposes of human entertainment.

Announced today by Assemblyman Richard Bloom, D-Santa Monica, the Orca Welfare and Safety Actwould outlaw SeaWorld-style shows, as well as captive breeding of the creatures. Violations would be punished by $100,000 in fines, six months in jail, or both.

No hearing has yet been scheduled on the proposal, which will require a majority vote to pass through legislature. It’s also unclear how much support the bill will have, though California has passed progressive animal legislation in the recent past, including bans on shark fin soup and hunting bears with dogs.

“There is no justification for the continued captive display of orcas for entertainment purposes,” Bloom said in a public statement. “These beautiful creatures are much too large and far too intelligent to be confined in small, concrete tanks for their entire lives. It is time to end the practice of keeping orcas captive for human amusement.”

Bloom’s proposed law isn’t the first of its kind: South Carolina banned the public display of dolphins in 1992, as did Maui County, Hawaii in 2002. In February of this year, New York state senator Greg Ball introduced a bill that would ban orca confinement in sea parks and aquariums.

Unlike those states, however, California is home to SeaWorld San Diego, where 10 orcas — roughly one-fifth of all captive orcas — are used in performances. “This is a huge state in which to have that ban,” said Lori Marino, a neurobiologist and founder of the Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy.

In recent years, the experience of captive orcas has come under scrutiny by animal advocates and some scientists, who say that aquarium conditions are simply inappropriate for animals as big, intelligent and highly social as orcas.

As evidence, advocates point to the physical and mental problems of orcas in captivity: They’re short-lived, prone to disease, have difficulty breeding, display extreme aggression and in some cases appear to be emotionally disturbed.

Such was the case with Tillikum, an orca at SeaWorld Orlando who killed three people, including SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau. Her death and SeaWorld’s orcas were the subject of Blackfish, a 2013 documentary that inspired Bloom’s measure, which was written with assistance from Blackfishdirector Gabriela Cowperthwaite and Naomi Rose of the Animal Welfare Institute.

SeaWorld San Diego did not reply to requests for comment, but in a statement, spokesman David Koontz criticized Bloom for “associating with extreme animal rights activists.”

Koontz said the bill reflected the “the same sort of out-of-the-mainstream thinking” as an infamous lawsuit, filed by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and dismissed in 2012, which invoked the United States Constitution’s slavery-abolishing 13th amendment as grounds for freeing SeaWorld’s orcas.

“We engage in business practices that are responsible, sustainable and reflective of the balanced values all Americans share,” wrote Koontz.

Andrew Trites, head of the University of British Columbia’s Marine Mammal Research Unit, said that misgivings about keeping whales and dolphins in captivity are not restricted to activists and extremists. They’re something many scientists grapple with.

“We think about this a lot,” he said, “I do understand the strong feelings of those who think it’s entirely wrong. I also understand the value of keeping them in captivity.”

Studying captive orcas can provide information about health and physiology that’s otherwise difficult to obtain, and can be used to benefit wild orcas, said Trites. “But it has to be about more than just entertainment,” he said. “They have to be serving some greater good.”

Marino noted that the bill allows research on orcas held for rehabilitation after being rescued from injury or stranding. Those orcas couldn’t be kept in aquariums, though, but rather in enclosed, shallow-water sea pens that are open to the public — a compromise, perhaps, between greater-good benefits and individual well-being.

Orcas now kept at SeaWorld would be returned to the wild or, if that’s not possible, also kept in sea pens.

If Bloom’s bill passes, it could inspire other such measures, said Marino. “The science is so overwhelming that members of the legislature are convinced, and are putting this out there,” she said. “This is historic.”

teamorkid:

scetaceans:

SeaWorld’s advertising schemes often confuse the heck outta me.

I don’t know if I feel embarassed, if I laugh or if I celebrate they’re digging their own grave.

teamorkid:

scetaceans:

SeaWorld’s advertising schemes often confuse the heck outta me.

I don’t know if I feel embarassed, if I laugh or if I celebrate they’re digging their own grave.

plays

whimsical-tail-flukes:

If I have to post this a thousand times, I will. 

SeaWorld is the reason the Taiji slaughters still exist today. 

This video explains it very clearly. 

Ignoring what you see in this video shows you care more about your few hours of fun at SeaWorld than you care about the animals themselves.